[Book] ‘Nihonjin ga isshou tsukaeru benkyou-hou’ by Tsuneyasu Takeda

Nihonjin ga isshou tsukaeru benkyou-hou [日本人が一生使える勉強法] by Tsuneyasu Takeda [竹田恒泰]

Nihonjin ga isshou tsukaeru benkyou-hou [日本人が一生使える勉強法] by Tsuneyasu Takeda [竹田恒泰]

There is no lack of self-help books for business people in Japan which regurgitate mainstream self-help ideas from America almost word-by-word. However, if I were to choose books on indigenous Japanese ideas of self-help for translating into English, Nihonjin ga isshou tsukaeru benkyou-hou [日本人が一生使える勉強法] by Tsuneyasu Takeda [竹田恒泰] would be one of them.

The author Tsuneyasu Takeda (1975 – present) was born as the great-great-grandson of the Meiji Emperor and graduated with a law degree at Keio University. By his own account, he sat for bookkeeping qualifications at middle school and started his own marketing consultancy business at high school. In his twenties, he travelled to Iraq during the war, got hit by the big question of what is the meaning of life, quit his lucrative consultancy business and withdrew to Kamakura where he lived on a shoe-string budget for three years, doing nothing but reading first-hand historical documents about the imperial family of Japan with the intent of making himself an expert on it. Later, he made it big with a bestseller on Emperor Koumei, rode on the wave of the media hullabaloo surrounding the Japanese succession controversy in the early 2000s as a commentator and became famous. He is now the author of a number of books on the imperial family and also runs a ramen restaurant in Tokyo. This particular book I am reviewing is about his personal life-story and useful ideas he has picked up along the way.  Continue reading